Candidates by Issue

Select an issue in the dropdown menu to see candidate stances (in their own words). Blue names are running for mayor, purple for council.

For expediency, all responses are copied from the Times Colonist Candidate Guide (mayor and council). It's cumbersome to navigate, so I thought it worthwhile to reformat their policy responses here.

Affordability

Lisa Helps

Young families and seniors are worried about not being able to afford to stay in Victoria. This should deeply concern us all. Affordability is more than the cost of housing. For decades we’ve let the cost of housing, childcare, and transportation rise far beyond incomes. I will continue to tackle these issues head-on. Tinkering with affordability won’t work. Bold action is required.

Stephen Hammond

Victoria doesn't have a housing problem. It has an affordable housing problem. Through this council's rezoning process, they are literally inflating the price of land, driving up the cost of all homes. Just building properties out of reach of most Victorians won't drive down the price of rentals and condos. This city has missed out on millions in CACs (community amenity contributions) allowing all Victorians to share in the building boom and help with affordable housing. That has to change.

Michael Geoghegan

By rescinding the Step Code and getting much more timely decision making we can reduce the cost of all new housing by $150,000 per unit. With density bonusing and use of vacant city land we can also leverage more in the way of low income units being built. I will lobby the province to build 5,000 units of student housing at UVic and Camosun thus freeing up 5,000 units of rental accommodation for everyone else. I will also make the building of affordable family housing a top priority.

Bruce McGuigan

Trickle-down economics doesn’t work for housing. City Hall must demand the effective participation of other levels of government.

Rob Duncan

I believe affordability and availability of housing is the primary problem facing our community at present, and has been neglected by all levels of government for a long time.

Saul Andersen

How about a rent freeze? And we should collect a per night fee from Airbnb users and direct that money towards affordable housing and community living projects.

David Arthur Johnston

Assess City assets so as to offer means and opportunity to offset the cost of living.

RyMo

Introduce health standards, to combat the old&cold with mold rental stock in Victoria. Bringing the standard of living up to where the costs are, and then watch the ripple effect of empowered people upon our local and global market places - and provide support as needed to close cost of living gaps.

Alexander Schmid

Victoria is undeniably expensive, but this may be a problem for which there are no sweeping solutions. As mayor I would consult with Council and ordinary citizens to see if ways can be found to alleviate the problem.

Geoff Young

New federal and Provincial funding will help create new units in buildings that house people of different income levels. The private sector is also creating hundreds of new units, and fairer assessment practices would encourage some units now used as hotel rooms to be transitioned to residential use. However, we must not forget that many of our most affordable units are found in suites and carriage houses in traditional residential neighbourhoods, and redevelopment may mean loss of these.

Charlayne Thornton-Joe

We have been struggling with the issue of affordability for many years as other levels of government were not at the table to assist with the building of affordable and/or rental housing. More affordable housing is now being built throughout the Region but not at the pace that is needed. We need more affordable housing for populations such as families, students and seniors. We need to protect from renovictions, and we need more supportive housing spread out throughout the Region.

William Tate

Require affordable housing included in new developments, protect existing residents from renovictions

Douglas Stewart

The only reason Victoria has a housing crisis is the government/banking system/real estate industry has conspired to put the interests of foreigners ahead of the needs of Canadians. The corrupt immigration system needs to be completely overhauled, investor programs/scams eliminated, and money laundering brought under control.

Ted Smith

Every large development should be required to have a section of affordable housing and other amenities. Protecting existing affordable housing and only allowing redevelopment when there is an increase in affordable housing is also important.

Jordan Reichert

Affordability is what I've heard from people in the community as the number one issue affecting them. Whether it is lack of affordable housing or the cost of living, people are struggling to make ends meet in Victoria. I want to change this by mandating and supporting affordable housing buildings and rental units across the city. I will also advocate to the province to freeze rent increases and for a guaranteed living wage to be trialed in Victoria.

Andrew Reeve

Affordability is on most people's minds this election, but it means something different to nearly everyone I speak with. To some, it's the lack of affordable housing. To others it is the lack of affordable transit, or rental availability, or even the high cost of goods and gas. Victoria needs to spend more time and resources listening and responding to these real affordability concerns of residents instead of spending tax dollars on unnecessary things such as musical parkade stairwells.

Sarah Potts

Affordability is a word I hear on nearly every doorstep, but, with respect, the housing crisis has not been a priority for all current councillors. Inaction has meant that we, unlike surrounding municipalities, have missed out on the community amenity contributions that, by now, could have built hundreds of units of affordable housing. We need a council that will demand our fair share from developers and ensure Victoria does not become the next Vancouver.

DelMar Martay

Implementation my Solutions to end homelessness and poverty

Pam Madoff

Take advantage of partnership opportunities to create affordable housing units. Retain existing affordable units. Incentivize adding units to existing building stock. Support projects that offer a variety of housing options.

Jeremy Loveday

Affordability is my top priority. We must act now to make sure Victoria doesn’t become like Vancouver or San Francisco. I will continue to stand up for housing rights, protecting existing rental stock, and boldy expanding non-market housing options. I pushed for inclusionary zoning which will see 15 percent of new large developments downtown designated as affordable rental housing. More needs to be done to ensure development works for residents and creates affordable and appropriate housing.

Grace Lore

My top priorities on affordability are more attainable housing in neighbourhoods. We need to build more housing near schools and on transportation routes, and plans for development should include incentives and requirements for affordable, family-friendly units. Childcare is also critical to an affordability plan. I have spoken to many families who have lost or had to leave employment because they lack access to safe, reliable care. I will push for a city-wide action plan on this issue.

Sean Leitenberg

My 20-20-20 plan for affordable housing would demand that 20% of all new homes in multi-unit projects be made available for 20% below market rent for 20 years or more. Victoria has missed the opportunity over the last 4 years to demand more below market rental units. These properties have been in the hands of private landowners for years and once plans are approved, the ability for Victoria to receive additional benefit from them is lost forever.

Anna King

Housing across the spectrum needs to be built in order to meet the demands of a growing population. Victoria needs affordable housing suitable for young families (2-3 BR units) especially. Increased childcare options are also necessary as there are heightened wait lists and high costs associated with childcare. Rezoning single detached homes into duplexes, quadplexes, coops, and small townhomes in all areas of Victoria will increase the number of units available overall.

Edison Kahakauwila

This is a position based question as affordability is a moving target. We can and should think before we spend as we have many renters and home owners that become marginalized by simple tax increases. I believe public projects should incorporate opportunities to save tax dollars and offset their cost thereby reducing the cost to the tax payer. City council has the tools to reduce paperwork, reduce building code duplications and allow tax holiday options for purpose built facilities.

Randie Johal

Work with neighborhoods to encourage them to be more receptive for new and expanded housing opportunities

Jesse Jimenez

Affordability is determined by the amount of money one has. Money is created and controlled by people and not by nature. In an insane community, money is horded by few individuals, thereby creating lack or scarcity to others. In a sane community, money is shared for the benefit of everybody. In order to raise the income of workers, industries are needed to start and flourish here.

Ben Isitt

I support Victoria playing a leadership role in acquiring land to facilitate provincial and federal investment in affordable, nonmarket housing for seniors, youth and working families. I support strong inclusionary zoning policies to mandate affordability in new projects. I support fiscal restraint in policing expenditures, to limit the financial impact on taxpayers. I support partnerships with all levels of government to increase access to nutritious local food and reduce child care costs.

Rose Henry

of...? housing as a way to prevent homelessness

James Harasymow

We need solutions to housing now. Homes for seniors and people who work, not more million dollar condos. The solution is nano-housing. I recommend dense housing close to the downtown cores amenities and employment opportunities. Ultra space saving units with beautiful common spaces like gardens, theaters, cafes and gyms. The key is fitting several units into the same space as a traditional one bedroom.

Riga Godron

The City of Victoria can and should do everything in its power to alleviate the skyrocketing cost of living. People who have worked and lived in Victoria for many years can not afford to stay in this municipality. The City of Victoria should be investing in housing diversity for multiple types of households. The City could help in all the areas that are of difficulty for residents trying to make ends meet: housing, childcare, parking, transportation, etcetera.

Marg Gardiner

Housing costs beyond reach. 5000+ units, approved or being prepared, may ease crunch. $90 Million Federal/provincial/CRD funding addressing affordability is good; Nigel Valley project (796 affordable-supportive) serves Saanich & Victoria. Inclusionary housing will help. 25% condos provide rental. Impact of AirB’n’Bs is evident, and must be addressed. CRD family housing could be expanded. Tenant affordability may be eased with reintroduction of a 'renters grant' similar to the homeowners grant.

Steve Filipovic

Housing pays for itself. Ownership housing is the cheapest form of housing. Yet most of the affordability programs are aimed at renters & the subsidies go to landlords. This isn't a fix. Victoria needs to step up & Create a Partnership Program assisting long term renters with good credit ratings into Ownership Opportunities as an Investment.This is a win win win, as the City gets its investment, the people get opportunity to own, & pressure on rental market should subside in Victoria.

Sharmarke Dubow

I propose addressing affordable housing crisis by: requiring that at least 50% of all new housing be affordable; using new rental zoning powers to protect and expand rentals by 4,000 units; and building 6,000 new units of affordable housing for workers, families, seniors and people transitioning out of homelessness. Beyond housing, I propose reducing bus fares to make transit more affordable and ensuring we have new childcare spaces, playgrounds, and 3+ bedroom units.

Laurel Collins

We have a detailed housing plan to tackle the housing crisis on our website. I am committed to ensuring that at least 50% of all new housing built is affordable, tying the definition of affordability to people’s income, as 10-15% below market value is not affordable for many. On council, I would use the new rental zoning powers to protect and expand rentals by 4,000 units. We also need to support families by building 3+ bedroom units and increasing the number of childcare spaces available.

Darlene Archibald

It is important that we pay attention to the impacts of developments and how they increase the value of surrounding areas, therefore potentially make housing less attainable. The idea of affordability is relative. Encouraging high paying jobs is something we could look at attracting to our city while increasing services to support lower income groups.

Stephen Andrew

I want to tackle affordability through a number of paths. Reduce property taxes, any increase makes our city more expensive. More units that entry homebuyers, young families and lower income members can afford. Work with experts in the field such as the Greater Victoria Housing Society and Pacifica Housing. I support opportunities to offer tax incentives for residents who want to add rental suites or studios. This could include a period of relief from the increase in property taxes

Marianne Alto

Continue neighbourhood planning with measured densification, balance growth with affordability and livability, review Local Area Plans every 5 years, incent large home conversions to multi-suites, reinstitute a secondary suite grant program, allow garden suites on lots with legal secondary suites, incent co-operative housing, explore subsidies, tax deferments, and other programs to support new home renters/buyers, pilot a project matching seniors with eligible lodgers, to start.

Gary Alberts

As a Councillor I would shorten the time it takes for Building Permits to be issued. Delays add to developers costs resulting in higher home prices. I would encourage developers to get funding from the Government of Canada and their Rental Construction Financing initiative (RCFi). A new Mayor and New Council should make more land available for organizations to take advanatage of the CRD's Regional Housing First Program (RHFP)

Municipal Amalgamation

Lisa Helps

I strongly support a Citizens Assembly to explore the costs, benefits, and disadvantages of the amalgamation of Victoria and Saanich. I hope that we get a “yes” from both on October 20th. On the face of it, having fewer municipalities makes sense and Saanich and Victoria would be a good place to start. But I want to see the evidence. I will be bound by the recommendations of the Citizens Assembly.

Stephen Hammond

First, on having to answer "would I rather cut taxes or provide more services" is not one or the other. I want to keep taxes at no more than the rate of inflation and I want to review the City's services to ensure we are spending on core services and not spending on pet projects. As to amalgamation, I agree with Amalgamation Yes that we need the province to fund a proper study to see if amalgamation makes sense. At first glance, it seems to make fiscal sense, but let's be sure.

Michael Geoghegan

Having a population within the CRD less than that of Burnaby split into 13 different municipalities is insane. A process has been started to move forward with regards to amalgamation of Victoria and Saanich. I support this initiative and I would like to see the matter put to a binding referendum no later than the end of my second term in office. I would not want to see amalgamation with Oak Bay until their serious infrastructure deficit issues are addressed.

Bruce McGuigan

Victoria must amalgamate itself first. Neighbourhoods in Victoria don’t feel their views are represented at City Hall.?

Rob Duncan

I believe amalgamation is logical and financial common sense.

Saul Andersen

This is something that we should be addressing... yesterday. Victoria, a city of 80000 or so, bears the brunt of the needs of a region of a half a million - someone needs to articulate a vision for the CRD that respects the needs of our very diverse municipalities, urban, rural and bedroom communities alike.

David Arthur Johnston

As it stands all the other municipalities should not fall under the authority of Victoria's tourism industry.

RyMo

Requires defining services and amenities that would be shared or lost by each municipality ( eg. sidewalks, urban forest, policing) . Agreeing on a minimum number of citizens to consult to ensure changes are consensual. Acknowledging the proposed sacrifices and savings in whatever the final compromisation of "amalgamation" looks like. Putting the final product to a vote.

Alexander Schmid

I believe that amalgamation will be of great advantage to Victoria. It is a case where common sense trumps sentimental considerations, since the administrative savings would be considerable, allowing us to fund other urgent problems in our communities.

Chris Zmuda

NOT NOW. We have enough problems of our own to solve first.

Geoff Young

The Citizens' Assembly, if approved, will allow a fuller look at amalgamation with Saanich, but I think the informal polls carried out last election showed a clear preference to reduce the large number of small municipalities sharing the governance of our modest sized city of Greater Victoria. A single larger municipality would allow voters to know and select their mayor and councillors with better information, and would allow leaders to negotiate better with federal and provincial governments.

Charlayne Thornton-Joe

I am supportive of finding ways to reduce costs and duplication. If it is found that Amalgamation achieves this and the citizens are supportive then I can support this. If not, then I believe we can still find efficiencies in at least the amalgamation of some services.

William Tate

I feel Amalgamation would streamline and coordinate services such as police, fire, and other services which the Greater Victoria area share.

Douglas Stewart

I'm against amalgamation because I believe it is easier to drown out individual voices when institutions become too large. Also, I have serious doubts that there will be significant cost savings.

Ted Smith

Joining the municipalities together makes sense but it needs to be done slowly and carefully. By far the biggest problem to be faced is making sure that neighbourhoods have plenty of opportunity to have input on developments.

Jordan Reichert

To support this, I would need to see a clear desire from the communities involved to undertake such a bureaucratic and cultural shift. At this point, it has not been an issue that people I have spoken with in the community have expressed concern about.

Andrew Reeve

Having served on the board of Amalgamation Yes, my position on this issue is clear. I am in favour of amalgamation, however I am not in favour of reducing 13 municipalities to a single super city. Reducing to four like the Peninsula/Core/Westshore/Sooke model would be ideal as it ensures local competition, respects some regional diversity, and would ensure greater accountability with four mayors as the face of the CRD.

Sarah Potts

A properly constituted citizen’s assembly can be an effective way to examine this highly politicized issue. In addition to examining the costs and benefits of full amalgamation with Saanich, I support moving quickly to improve public safety and reduce costs by amalgamating the Victoria, Oak Bay, and Saanich police departments.

DelMar Martay

Sharing information and costs to be more affordable

Pam Madoff

Many of the goals associated with amalgamation could be realized through integrated service delivery. Amalgamation has not been shown to result in cost reductions. Emphasis should be placed on efficient service delivery. The advantages, and disadvantages, of amalgamation must be clearly understood before moving in this direction

Jeremy Loveday

I support enhanced regional cooperation including the creation of a Regional Transportation Authority and the amalgamation of emergency services. Amalgamation has been discussed for decades and I support finally having an independent, objective study of its benefits and drawbacks. While I personally lean towards favouring amalgamation of core municipalities, I will respect the wishes of residents as shown through the referendum question on the ballot in this election.

Grace Lore

I support the referendum question for a citizens assembly. I believe that there is a serious need for a more coordinated strategy on housing and transportation in the CRD. I believe there are also benefits to be gained from police and fire services shared across the region.

Sean Leitenberg

I believe in an amalgamation that will help share the costs of services. We still need our separate municipalities though to continue to govern their growth and character.

Anna King

Yes, Anna King believes that the citizens assembly to consider amalgamation is a good step forward. The municipalities of Victoria and Saanich are similar and there are many opportunities for more streamlined communication and efficiencies that may result in cost savings for both municipalities.

Edison Kahakauwila

This topic is best proposed to the provincially elected candidates and the electorate by referendum. My personal views is that our current system should insure that regional considerations not be lost by local autonomy. I am not convinced a larger bureaucratic mega city is the answer and have concerns about the operational cost and effectiveness of the CRD.

Randie Johal

Amalgamation of Victoria and Saanich will give our new city of 200,000 residents a much stronger voice in our region and with provincial and federal governments. Efficiencies in delivery of services will be created through amalgamation.

Jesse Jimenez

Early in life, I learned divided you fall and together you conquer. Having different cities and towns create division and dissonance among the residents. City planners design, implement and maintain more adroitly well-coordinated transportation, communication, water supply and sanitary systems in a unified network. The residents will benefit the most if the well thought out systems were executed. The amalgamation should be viewed as marriage of equal entities rather than corporate takeover.

Ben Isitt

I strongly support amalgamation of police services in the Capital Region, which accounts for more than 1/3rd of City of Victoria taxes. I believe amalgamation of police services would increase public safety and improve efficiency. I also favour exploring amalgamation of additional services through the CRD, with reform of CRD governance to increase accountability, including direct election of directors and representation of First Nations. I support retaining municipal authority over land use.

Rose Henry

of essential services such as emergency services for disasters

James Harasymow

Hoping one day our neighbors will see the strength of working together and all the things that could be gained from combined effort. If elected I will try to seduce them by making Victoria so wonderful they will have no choice but to become one with the Jedi, um, I mean our cool city!

Riga Godron

Do the other municipalities need to pay their fair share for policing regional festivals? Yes. Should the municipalities that benefit from BC transit equally contribute to the infrastructure? Yes. In 2014, the representatives from Amalgamation Yes kept referring to Surrey as having a similar population as Greater Victoria, and using it as a model for streamling services. I do not want to live in Surrey. The RCMP has 500 members patrolling that City because of all the gang shootings. No thanks.

Marg Gardiner

I'm a founding member of Amalgamation Yes and a Director. In 2014, Victoria and Saanich residents voted for an amalgamation study. While residents of most areas voted for study, only Victoria and Saanich are moving forward. Analysis of two municipalities, separately and as one city, will be more easily understood. The Citizens Assembly process will result in randomly selected residents from Saanich and Victoria assessing reports and making recommendations; it is 'Worth the Study'.

Steve Filipovic

No way. CETA is an International Trade Agreement that we are signed into, it places City Services for Contract bidding. Amalgamation is being set up to serve our then larger City to Multinational Firms who will be bidding on services like Garbage Collecting, we will be obligated to accept the lowest bid, leaving our region without executive jobs. There is no cost savings to be had but much to lose. For this reason is it better to remain independent & continue to work together through the CRD.

Sharmarke Dubow

I do not support merging cities without fully understanding which communities may be merged and what the goals are. Instead, I support forming a citizen’s assembly to study amalgamation and I support merging Saanich, Oak Bay, and Victoria Police Departments. I also support increasing the CRD’s role to improve regional services. In many Canadian cities, amalgamation has not led to better services or cost-savings. Amalgamation may also limit the time officials have to spend on local issues.

Laurel Collins

Municipal politicians should not be making the decisions on full amalgamation as the outcome directly affects their employment, and it is a conflict of interest. I think that there should be a citizen’s assembly and an arms-length body to support the decision making process on amalgamation. I personally support increased sharing of services, and the amalgamation of regional policing with Oak Bay, Saanich and Central Saanich Police Departments to reduce costs and improve public safety.

Darlene Archibald

I am in support of amalgamated services. I see that there are 4 natural fits for municipalities to group together. I am not in support of Saanich and Victoria joining together at this time but I may change my mind as new information becomes known. Vote yes to explore how amalgamation will or will not work for the city.

Stephen Andrew

While I do not believe amalgamation will reap major savings, I see the potential for the better delivery of services across the region. We can remove duplication of operations and redeploy any savings to provide more services, a wider array of options for affordable housing and to open our region to more avenues of government funding and partnerships.

Marianne Alto

I believe some amalgamation within the region will produce better land use and transportation planning, and better service delivery. I support having an informed conversation about the pros and cons of amalgamation, and will vote yes on establishing a citizens’ assembly to do just that. Whatever residents choose, I will support.

Gary Alberts

We should be looking at it. Are we being efficient with taxpayer money? In 2014 88% of Victoria residents voted yes to study amalgamation. No progress has been made in four years on this issue. Current Mayor and Council are again putting an Amalgamation question on the October ballot. It is time for a New Mayor and a New Council to deal with what 88% of the voters asked for.

Transportation

Lisa Helps

Transportation is a key regional issue. First priority for improvements to regional transportation is bus rapid transit from downtown to Langford. With the current plan, a bus commute from Colwood to downtown will be 30 minutes faster! There’s more to do. The South Island Prosperity Project’s response to Canada’s Smart Cities Challenge will hopefully receive $10 million to make integrated mobility (car-share, bike-share, biking, walking, transit, driving) available, convenient and affordable.

Stephen Hammond

I want Victoria to be part of a transportation plan that makes sense and will actually make decisions, as opposed to just meeting and talking. I want to encourage people to find alternatives to being in single occupant cars by walking, cycling, car-sharing, car-pooling and transit. However, I want to stop the war on cars where parking is being removed at the expense of businesses and consumers. Victoria has an aging population, with many people relying on cars for many reasons.

Michael Geoghegan

As a result of the $15 million bike lane fiasco, traffic into the downtown core is down while congestion is up. I will fix this by relocating bike lanes to quieter secondary roads. The new bike lanes will also be much less obtrusive, much less expensive and much safer. Traffic lights will be synchronized and once there is sufficient density in both Victoria and Colwood I will lobby for LRT between Vic West and Westshore. I will also lobby for the Malahat bypass to be built.

Bruce McGuigan

We need a regional transportation strategy developed with the CRD and the Province.

Rob Duncan

I'm in favour of experimenting with the bus system to make it more appealing to commuters, in order to reduce the amount of cars used for commuting. Given that not everyone can ride a bike but everyone, or almost everyone, can ride a bus, I believe the bus system holds far more potential to affect commuting habits than separated bike lanes.

Saul Andersen

Sensible cycling infrastructure! A transit strategy! Counter-flow lanes at rush hour! Reasonable parking enforcement! For example, you can get a ticket 3 minutes after your meter expires yet I REGULARLY see cars parked in the curb/tow lane on Quadra St throughout the posted times - this is not only annoying, it's dangerous and unnecessary!

David Arthur Johnston

Make the default bus ticket a $5.00 Day Pass. No new bike lanes. Finish all current road work with the mentality that new projects will be rare.

RyMo

A culture shift where we resolve the single car (9-5, in&out) commuter, from neighbouring municipalities, from impacting our air quality, access to shops and services, and burdening the city with increasing maintenance costs. Advocate for priority lanes for mass transit. Reduce signage to a agreed upon speed limit and Left turn procedure, instead of the street by street case we have now. Rename the Johnson St. Bridge, to The RyMo Pleasurefare crossing ( just jokes, ha!)

Alexander Schmid

A high priority. The option of rail service as a means to alleviate road traffic congestion should be pursued more vigorously, in cooperation with other municipalities sharing the line.

Geoff Young

Dedicated bus lanes to the western communities will help alleviate the congestion on our highways by creating more bus commuters. Safer bike routes will also divert commuters to that mode. I do feel we moved ahead too quickly after the Pandora bike path was completed and should have paused to gain more experience on how well bike paths work, what can be improved and how they can be built more economically. Construction markets are tight right now and delay might have produced lower costs.

Charlayne Thornton-Joe

We need to support and improve all modes of transportation. Transportation and affordability are tied together as we need to make it easier for people to live close to where they work so that travelling to and from work is quicker and easier. We need to improve transit (timing and routes) to encourage more people to use. We also need more late night transit to assist in getting late night workers and shift workers to and from work.

William Tate

Have a few more buses, explore new ideas such as a ferry to Colwood.

Douglas Stewart

We need to make downtown more accessible whatever your preferred mode of transportation. Fifteen hundred parking stalls have been removed from the core since 2010. This does not encourage people to shop downtown.

Ted Smith

We desperately need a rapid transit system to Langford and a working, daily rail system bringing workers, shoppers and tourists into downtown. This would dramatically improve the business climate in the downtown core, help the environment, save travellers time and be safer than pouring all of our money into highway improvements. We need low budget bike lanes. We need sound signals on all lights and crosswalks for the visually impaired.

Jordan Reichert

I have heard from many people in the community that they find it difficult to get around Victoria by public transit. By advocating for a Regional Transit Authority, I would bring about a comprehensive, environmentally sustainable, affordable, safe, and efficient transit network that served the needs of our neighbourhoods in and between municipalities. I will also support enhancing active transportation including improvement of sidewalks and crosswalks, and a region wide bike network.

Andrew Reeve

Transportation is a common theme on the doorsteps. People are frustrated with downtown congestion, the lack of parking, poorly-designed bike lanes, and unreliable public transit. I believe the city has failed to listen to these concerns. When I talk about the need for a city that works for everyone, I mean everyone. Drivers, cyclists, transit-users, pedestrians, and those with mobility issues all need to feel safe and welcome throughout Victoria. We need to do better.

Sarah Potts

There are no school buses for public school students in Victoria. To give parents a break, and get more cars out of rush hour traffic, I support free youth bus passes. I would make transit more affordable for low income earners by way of sliding-scale passes. To get people moving efficiently through the region, I would install high occupancy vehicle lanes, complete the rapid transit link to the West Shore, and expand the infrastructure to support faster movement of buses throughout the region.

DelMar Martay

More park and ride with Buses

Pam Madoff

A focus on integrated, affordable, transportation options. Utilizing the opportunities provided by the E&N corridor.

Jeremy Loveday

Getting from one neighbourhood to another should be safe and convenient no matter what mode of transportation you choose. To accomplish this we need to invest in active transportation including upgrades to improve pedestrian safety, and moving forward with safe and well-planned cycling infrastructure. I will advocate for the creation of a Regional Transportation Authority and for investments in public transit to lower user costs and increase ridership by improving frequency of service.

Grace Lore

Public transportation is critical to a healthy and equitable city. I will support free transit for children and pursue a sliding scale for those with low incomes as has been done successfully in other cities. Active transportation makes for healthy communities and families, and walkable neighbourhoods increase support for local businesses in the area.

Sean Leitenberg

We need to increase our public transportation, by creating a bus system within the city with areas on the outskirts of the downtown to park your vehicle or bike and take a bus into the city for free. These buses will run frequently and on a dependable schedule.

Anna King

Efficient transportation is needed in Victoria. Some ways to increase efficiency is to have dedicated bus lanes during rush hour, having GPS tracking info on buses publicly available to passengers to plan trips accordingly, and exploring the feasibility of a light rail along the existing rail line. Further, reviewing the bus transfer/ticketing system, especially for low-income passengers is essential in increasing overall affordability for families in Victoria.

Edison Kahakauwila

The CRD must tackle this as it’s not going to get better and study after study kicks the can down the road with huge costs. The city has tried to find some alternative measures but has actually caused more congestion and difficulty for delivery and transit operators in core areas. We have a city that requires all modes of transportation to work we have a population that needs parking to support our local businesses. If we are to truly find long term solutions we need to consider some LRT routes.

Randie Johal

Transportation is key to our future, suggested improvements should focus on: Ensuring safe and maneuverable roadways for all modes of travel. Synchronized lights for improved traffic flow. Greater attention to repairs and maintenance to all roads.

Jesse Jimenez

Transportation is a basic element needed in the prosperity of a city. The rate of transferring goods, workers and service providers in and out of the city determines the growth of that city. The faster goods are transported to the production site the more products are produce that can be sold and bought. The faster the employees get to their jobs and go home with minimal stress the better they will produce products or services. City of Victoria does not have full control of this system.

Ben Isitt

I support the creation of a Regional Transportation Authority with responsibility for transportation planning and operations, transitioning toward high-quality, low-fare, energy-efficient public transit throughout the region to make transit the mode of choice for longer trips. I support investment in walking and cycling infrastructure to make active transportation safe, efficient and enjoyable. I support renewal of rail transport on the Island and mandating EV charging in new developments.

Rose Henry

needs to be affordable and accessible for everyone

James Harasymow

Amalgamation. Only as one can we get this done. Somebody hash tag that. Group think or we will sink. I could do this all day...

Riga Godron

The City of Victoria cannot pass By-Law to force all residents to use the same 'people powered vehicles.' Just because Canada has a National Health Act and we all enjoy the benefit of knowing that if we injure our heads the tax payers will pay to put us back together, that does not mean that the Federal or Provincial government can force the wearing of helmets when not lying in bed. Should people ride bikes? If people want to ride bikes. Do not force your bike riding lifestyle on others.

Marg Gardiner

I support the City's transportation hierarchy; policies must consider needs of all users of our streets (sidewalks and roadways); accessibility for those with mobility challenges must be met. Large vehicle fleets (BC Transit and commercial large vehicle transport) should be pressed to convert or set-targets for lower emission vehicles. Walking should be promoted, and new cycle routes (lanes) should serve neighbourhood needs.

Steve Filipovic

Investment is Transit serves Victoria well. We have got to keep Victoria moving. I'd like to see Victoria invest in Buses fit with the necessary hardware so they can adapt to riding the rails! They could use the E&N rail line and bring people from the Western Communities into Victoria then return on the highway. Doing the loops the opposite way for the evening rush hours. This could greatly reduce the need for traffic into Victoria & build a business case for re-invigorating Train Service.

Sharmarke Dubow

I support removal of fares for youth under 18 as a measure to build habits of riding public transit and to provide a break for parents. We need to also look at more affordable passes for low-income people and other incentives that will get people to choose the bus over commuting by car. In addition, I will work to complete the rapid transit link to the West Shore and expand the infrastructure to support faster movement of buses throughout the region.

Laurel Collins

I will work with BC Transit to reduce bus fares and improve routes. I support removing fares for youth, as a way to build a life-long relationship with public transit. I will push for improved walkability, for additional bus shelters and benches, and for bike storage on municipal property. On the CRD, I will advocate for light rail, and in the short term I will work to complete the rapid transit link to the West Shore, expanding infrastructure to support faster movement of buses in the region.

Darlene Archibald

All methods of travel need to be accommodated; pedestrians, cars, bus, wheelchair and bikes. Each of us deserves to arrive safely to our destinations. We need adequate parking. I am not supportive of parking variances. All developments need at least one visitor spot to allow for deliveries, services or supports. I am in support of carshare memberships and developments that purchase cars and memberships for the people living in their buildings. I love to see families on the bike lanes.

Stephen Andrew

In Victoria we struggle to overcome the divisiveness of cycling infrastructure. Improved consultation and leadership that does not create an “use and them” approach. We need balance for all options. We need more parking downtown. Every time we remove parking we lose revenue and space for cars. I want to see larger and increased disability parking. We must also look to create an effective regional transportation plan.

Marianne Alto

As the City and region grow, we must act now to create balanced options for transit riders, motorists, pedestrians, cyclists (electric and manual), embracing new sustainable solutions. We can create a regional transportation planning and operations commission, press for more buses on City and inter-City routes, offer free parking in public parkades for EVs, designate more anchor parking spots for car share, to start.

Gary Alberts

Bicycle lanes should not interfere with buses, vehicles or pedestrians. We all need to share the roads. The current designs on Pandora Ave and Fort St need changes. As a City Councillor, I will consult with Business owners, BC Transit, Delivery drivers, Pedestrians, and Bicyclists before we begin anymore construction. With a new Mayor and New Council, I will place a moratorium on further expansion, including the lanes on Wharf St., of bike lanes until proper consultation has taken place.

Homelessness

Lisa Helps

With with regard to the question about tent cities - displacing people doesn’t work. Tent cities aren’t great and are a national shame in a country as prosperous as Canada. But what we saw in Victoria was a court ruling that the Province had to provide housing to people before the tent city could be shut down. Almost all of the people who were housed directly from the tent city are still housed. Housing is not enough. Adequate mental health and addictions support is also necessary.

Stephen Hammond

I have spoken for years about the need for our province to stop cutting desperately needed services to persons with addictions and mental health issues. Tent cities are a result of this neglect, however a tent city is a magnet for the worst of criminals, preying on those inside and making communities dangerous. Working with the province, I want real supports for our most vulnerable and real progress because the goal of "ending homelessness by 2018" is clearly not working.

Michael Geoghegan

The most cost effective way to deal with the homeless is to provide basic housing. Playing whack a mole with the homeless is more expensive, much more cruel and ultimately futile. I will lobby both the province and the federal government to provide low income housing not just in Victoria but throughout the region and including local First Nations. Those with serious mental and physical health issues also need to be given proper treatment.

Bruce McGuigan

Victoria has done more than its share to fix this regional problem. We can’t solve it alone.

Rob Duncan

The United Nations tells us housing is a human right. Victoria needs to elect a Mayor and Council who will make it a top priority to seriously address the ongoing human rights violation that is homelessness in our community. The short-term solution involves finding locations for installing the modular mobile housing that the Province has been promoting. I have a long list of potential sites on my website.

Saul Andersen

Tent cities aren't the answer, but neither is increased policing (or more questionable bylaws). Housing/zoning/land use reforms are necessary, but the process needs to be informed, if not led, by those directly involved so that we might more adequately meet the needs of the street-involved community.

David Arthur Johnston

There is an 'embraced naivety' in this town that delusionally, and commonly, pretends acting rich attracts affluence even though we are poorer than poor. The result is a social engineered addiction epidemic that is masking an internal refugee crisis from potential investors.

RyMo

I will put the fear of RyMo into Provincial and Federal representatives that think they can neglect the needs of those impacted by homelessness. We need to be included in creating a National Housing Strategy, we need the Province to do better than legislating rights around tents in parks. We need a network of support from all levels of government.

Alexander Schmid

The problem of homelessness can only be solved with national funding. The municipalities don't have the means or resources to adequately cope with it. As Mayor I would meet with my counterparts of other Canadian cities to petition the Federal Government for adequate support. Unless the problem is solved simultaneously in all Canadian cities, local communities will be tempted to be less welcoming in the hope that the problem migrates somewhere else. I would also petition the Province to restore funding for mental health institutions, to take care of the most vulnerable among us.

Chris Zmuda

Years of neglect have created this dilemma of tent cities. Now, we need to attract federal and provincial funding to solve THEIR problem and provide alternative housing HERE.

Geoff Young

In the long run, housing at low cost can help those who suffer only from a shortage of income. For others, housing combined with adequate support and supervision is needed. At present, adequate support and supervision is often not being provided. In the short run, we should put our resources into providing sufficient safe, warm, supervised shelter beds that we can prohibit parks or street camping. Tent camps have a proven record of failure to provide minimal levels of safety or supervision.

Charlayne Thornton-Joe

The Mayor's Task Force results showed that if we did not do anything, our homeless population could increase to a maximum of 30% each year. We have not seen this increase due to the housing and shelters that have been built, however, we have not seen the numbers reduce as we are not building enough supportive and affordable housing to meet the need and at the pace that is necessary. It is exciting that a Therapeutic Community is being opened in October as this will greatly assist.

William Tate

Work with the Provincial and Federal Government on creating residences with mental services as well as possible modular structures, portables.

Douglas Stewart

It seems Nancy Reagan was right after all.

Ted Smith

We need to start creating facilities that can accomodate for the extremely poor and difficult to house without pushing them from park to park every night or forcing them to live in horrible conditions like 844 Johnson St. Building tiny homes, portable homes and other options for the extremely poor can give them a sense of community, cost less emergency resources and minimize public disorder. We cannot simply build our way out of this problem as it is much larger than Victoria.

Jordan Reichert

Having worked in the field of mental health and addictions for over a decade I have seen homelessness continue to rise along with the cost of living and lack of affordable housing. We must act with compassion towards people experiencing homelessness and prioritize finding them safe affordable housing. In tandem, we must provide more beds for addictions recovery, short and long term, and more mental health services to support people once their lives have stabilized with housing.

Andrew Reeve

As Chairman of Threshold Housing Society, I know the tremendous amount of good that can come from tackling the homelessness issue in Victoria with smart policy and effective resource allocation. Our transitional housing & life skills programming for at-risk youth has helped countless young people stay off the streets and build healthy futures. We need a regional approach that focuses on providing facilities and services to our most under-served and vulnerable across the entire housing spectrum.

Sarah Potts

The homeless population in Victoria is diverse. Seniors living in their cars, youth aged out of foster care, people struggling with poor mental health and addictions, and workers forced to sleep in tents because of a lack of affordable housing. Studies have shown over and over that a Housing First Strategy saves lives and costs half as much as alternatives. To further alleviate the issue we need more pathways to treatment and recovery, more supportive housing, and more youth shelter spaces.

DelMar Martay

Spend the money now to save it later. These are people's lives were talking here!

Pam Madoff

As Victoria becomes less affordable there are no easy solutions. Working people now face the threat of homelessness. A continuum of housing options in order to allow people to transition through the system, and free up space for others, is greatly needed.

Jeremy Loveday

In my first term, I pushed for the creation of the CRD Regional Housing First program which ultimately secured $90 million for affordable housing and will build 2000 homes over the next 3 years. To eliminate homelessness we will need further investments in housing. We will also need courageous and compassionate leadership that will work to destigmatize mental health and addictions and to attract treatment and recovery options to our region.

Grace Lore

Mental health, addiction, and homelessness are major issues in our city. The city needs to identify city-owned land for the development of supportive housing. In particular, we need more low barrier recovery housing. I support harm reduction and we need to also ensure that those seeking treatment are able to access housing which supports their recovery. Further, at present we have no emergency housing for families. This must be addressed.

Sean Leitenberg

We must work with social services and the province to address the issue with subsidized housing and a program that helps identify individuals at risk before they end up on the street.

Anna King

Victoria needs supported recovery housing for those below the poverty line and/or have additional vulnerabilities such as addictions or mental health illnesses. Increased low-barrier shelter spaces that can accommodate a variety of circumstances, such as families with children, couples, and transgendered peoples are also needed. Housing the vulnerable people in small pockets within vibrant neighbourhoods is important for a fully integrated community where neighbours can care for one another.

Edison Kahakauwila

Dealing with the issue of homelessness is multi-faceted and cannot be solved by one government, agency or community. To effectively deal with this issue, governments must be adaptive and creative in their solutions. The need for collaboration with other government bodies is key to the success of helping those in need. Public green spaces are not a reasonable alternative to housing the homeless.

Randie Johal

Following models of Nigel Valley Neighborhood and modular home construction. Creating a positive community within the residential housing with all supports to achieve independence. No more band-aid solution.

Jesse Jimenez

The physical, emotional, mental and spiritual anguish that bears with this condition must be extremely unpalatable for anyone to experience. Unfortunately, we have several individuals amongst us who are tolerating this. This situation has plagued cities for centuries and it is still not fully understood with remedies readily available. We cannot just discard them as they are sentient beings. I think that the first step is to have a real communication with them to solicit a workable solution.

Ben Isitt

I support implementation of the Regional Housing First Program, to ensure housing with supports for people in need. I spearheaded this new regional program, harnessing $60-million in provincial and federal funds alongside $30-million for all municipalities and electoral areas in the region. A key component of this program is provincial operating funds for 24/7 staffing, to ensure people have the support they need to remain stably housed and supported in leading healthy lives.

Rose Henry

we need to work on preventing this situation from getting of control. The downtown core should not have to carry the brunt of all services such as food banks , shelters and health care nor should the un-housed be moved around like farm stock. They need a place to store their possessions during the day while taking care of their most basic needs...like health, hygiene, jobs and finding shelter.

James Harasymow

Addictions and mental illness ere the real issue when it comes to homelessness. We need facilities to help with these issues.

Riga Godron

Build 20% low-income housing units in every high end luxury building. Get away from the model where we green light gentrification. Where we allow highly expensive housing to be built. Where we allow residents to be renovicted from affordable housing. Where we think it is alright to build low-income housing separate from high end units. Homeless people are not only individuals on income assistance. Families need affordable housing options too. The City of Victoria should capture more amenities.

Marg Gardiner

Eliminating homelessness for the City, region, or country, is an impossible task. The end-line keeps moving. Tenting must be permitted when shelter beds are not available. That does not mean 'tent cities'. The City can't solve local homelessness by itself. It has neither fiscal capacity nor land-base to house everyone who wants to live here. The main responsibility lies with the federal and provincial governments; the City must send problems to these governments.

Steve Filipovic

The situation was created by actions of an outgoing NDP Gov & the inactions of the incoming Liberal Gov, in closing mental health facilities. A Temporary but Proper support facility complete with wash rooms and a common Kitchen could to be place on Provincial property. The City could raise Accommodation Taxes to pay for it. Once it is set up with proper supports & agreed to rules, we can get our Parks back knowing the people are cared for & immense pressures are on Provincial Level to act.

Sharmarke Dubow

It is a deadly time for people living on the streets: in 2017, 82 people were killed by fentanyl. The best solution to homelessness will always be a home. I support a Housing First approach that gets people off of the streets and into pathways to treatment and recovery. I want to triple the targeted future social housing developments from 2,000 to 6,000 units by leveraging regional, provincial and federal funding, and I will advocate that the over 150 homeless youth in Victoria are prioritized.

Laurel Collins

support a Housing First approach that prioritizes getting people off of the streets. We need both long term and immediate solutions, and housing is one vital step. We need pathways to treatment and recovery for those struggling with addiction. I am committed to addressing youth homelessness by providing 150 new housing units for youth. I would advocate for increased shelter spaces, and I support establishing an emergency response fund for community responses to the opioid crisis.

Darlene Archibald

All people should be housed. There are some that are not able to be responsible enough for themselves to allow them to live alone or unsupported. Demanding Federal and Provincial support is essential in addressing this need. Changing zoning and making suites legal will help by increasing the rental stock.

Stephen Andrew

Almost 600 people in the CRD are identified as Absolutely Homeless. Working with organizations such as the Greater Victoria Coalition to End Homelessness, we will implement a proven Housing First strategy to shelter every one of them within the CRD and eliminate the need to sleep in parks and on the street. Tent cities, piecemeal approaches and short-term plans are not acceptable. For the health of everyone, we must ensure lasting safety, dignity and hope for our most underserved.

Marianne Alto

Homeless Victorians need our compassion and action, while we build more homes and increase economic parity, public safety and effective social service delivery. We can help facilitate harm reduction training and professional development, foster additional harm reduction services in the region, facilitate enhanced palliative and elder care services, construct a supportive housing policy to distribute units throughout the city, to start.

Gary Alberts

The provincial government spent $3 million in legal fees and site cleanup after homeless people camped on the Victoria courthouse lawn in 2016. Money that could have been targeted at the root of the problem, chronic poverty and homelessness. We need programs aimed at giving our less fortunate residents a chance to break the cycle and become contributing members of the city. With a new Mayor and New Council I will get the CRD, VIHA, the BC Govt. and the Federal Govt. to provide the beds needed.

Taxes

Lisa Helps

Taxes are a key driver of affordability. Over the past four years we have had the lowest tax increases in the past 10 years. Of every tax dollar that people pay, local governments receive only 8 cents. That is not enough to deal with the challenges that are downloaded to us, like the effects of homelessness, mental health and addictions, cannabis legalization, and greater requirements on police from higher levels of government. We will take a more creative approach to keep taxes increases low.

Stephen Hammond

Between 2012 and 2018 the cumulative Consumer Price Index (CPI) has increased 9.3% while Victoria's cumulative property taxes have increased 22.4% This mayor and council have been using your homes and businesses as the City's ATMs, with no limit on what can be withdrawn. My NewCouncil.ca team has pledged to raise taxes no higher than the rate of inflation, at the most. Victorians, whether you own or rent, pay for these taxes and it eats into the livability of this city. That has to stop.

Michael Geoghegan

Municipal taxes in Victoria are doubling every eight years. Langford has proven that with proper fiscal management you can hold the line on taxes while greatly improving community infrastructure and services. The CRD has wasted $60 million of taxpayers dollars through its mishandling of the sewage project. With improved fiscal transparency and accountability I believe we can keep further tax increases to a minimum while improving services and amenities.

Bruce McGuigan

Municipal taxpayers cannot fund failures by other levels of government.

Rob Duncan

As I don't see the funding for my policy initiatives as coming from municipal taxes by and large but instead from other levels of government, I see no reason that municipal taxes should need to be increased.

Saul Andersen

Taxes keep getting higher and the burden of the wider region falls on our fair (and fairly small) city... not a problem easily fixed which is why we need to start the discussion about our VISION for Greater Victoria.

David Arthur Johnston

Had a tiered and customizable 'bridge debt' tax plan but am excluding it as of learning of the looming CRD tax.

RyMo

Taxes need to reflect current maintenance (boring, I know), as well as continue to propagate services and amenities that will serve us into the future. If our spending strategy is merely less taxes = better, we'll have another realm of neglected maintenance ( bridge ), and be passing a larger cost into the future. We need to think ten years and twenty years from now. What will the young people of today, be given to succeed as adults, and stay in Victoria.

Alexander Schmid

This may be an unpopular view, but when a community is dealing with the kind of challenges Victoria faces, one must do what is needed, including increasing tax revenue. I believe that Victorians resent the waste of public funds, like in the spectacular case of the Johnson Street bridge. They will not begrudge a reasonable increase in taxes to address the most urgent problems of our community. With the transparent administration I will run, every tax dollar will be accounted for.

Chris Zmuda

We need to use common sense to make good judgments and apply the revenues that we already have.

Geoff Young

Often our council has wanted to do too much and become involved in too many issues. Leading the way on every initiative is costly in staff time, sometimes at the expense of providing basic services efficiently. Our public engagement and planning processes are time consuming and expensive, but often leave citizens feel unheard. We need to keep taxes at reasonable levels for both residents and businesses.

Charlayne Thornton-Joe

It is never a desire to raise taxes but we have heard that citizens would like to keep the level of service or even improve on it which often means an increase on taxes. Also, we must continue to put money into reserves to assist with our aging infrastructure.

William Tate

Home owners deserve a council that is frugal with city tax money, not starting major expenditures like a new Crystal Pool, which just needs maintenance.

Douglas Stewart

Of all levels of government, municipal spending is the most out of control. By far the largest expense in any budget is wages, which is why the unions work so diligently behind the scenes to install some of their shills on council. With all the construction going on in Victoria, how come the city coffers aren't full? SHOW ME THE MONEY

Ted Smith

As a business owner and manager I have seen the taxes constantly going up faster than inflation. It would be my aim to never let taxes go up faster than inflation. While I think it is great the city is in such a great financial position, it does not seem fair that this public institution be allowed to profit so much from taxes every year that it accumulates wealth.

Jordan Reichert

It is essential that council always be mindful of striking a balance between capital investments and services, and lowering taxes. Spending can greatly enhance the community with downstream positive benefits, but the community must also see the projects as in their interest while the burden of costs must stay within what the community can afford. I would seek to obtain a balance of spending to serve the community best while not raising taxes outside of what they felt was reasonable.

Andrew Reeve

Property taxes have increased over the rate of inflation for years, amidst a building boom, with residents seeing no noticeable benefits or increase in services. In the case of renters such as myself, those tax increases are passed down to tenants contributing to a lack of affordability. Let's bring back some fiscal responsibility to City Hall so that we can reduce the tax burden, cut frivolous spending, and re-allocate funds to increase the budgets of important core services to residents.

Sarah Potts

Many people increasingly struggle with our property tax burden. To reduce the pressure the city places on homeowners, I would support diversifying our tax base by implementing a land value capture tax. This would provide the city additional revenue when property values increase due to infrastructure projects or similar changes. I would also lobby the provincial government to allow Victoria to tax empty homes, as Vancouver does.

DelMar Martay

Make the ones, creating the harm, pay the Tax

Pam Madoff

A balancing act in terms of funding the services that the public needs and expects with the ability to pay. It is important that each year Council goes over the budget, on a line by line basis, having previously identified a goal related to a cap on potential increases.

Jeremy Loveday

Many homeowners in the City are having trouble making ends meet. I opposed both the 2018 Budget and the 4% residential tax increase because I believed it was more than many residents could afford and because the budget did not do enough to address the housing crisis. To ensure the city does not repeat the costly mistakes from the Johnson Street bridge project, I voted against major capital expenditures until we received the “Lessons Learned” report from that project.

Grace Lore

Taxes paid by homeowners, renters, and businesses in our area must be treated with respect and spent wisely. Property taxes in Victoria are currently the third lowest in the country and they should be kept low to ensure that housing costs are not further increased and that business are encouraged to operate in our communities.

Sean Leitenberg

I believe with fiscally responsibility we can grow this city and reduce taxes. I want to manage this city like a business with proper budgeting and projects done on time and on budget. The increase in density of high end condos should be increasing our overall tax base and reducing our taxes, but our taxes keep going up with unnecessary projects and over spending.

Anna King

Taxes provide funding for much-needed social services and municipal infrastructure. The only area of review should be regarding taxes on small, local businesses where there should be increased incentive for entrepreneurs to create innovative services and products that serve Victoria's local economy.

Edison Kahakauwila

Every citizen is one tax payer. When the city raises taxes and the CRD raises taxes it relates it to only a X-number of dollars increase but fails to address that its compounded on decades of increases. Do we receive more in services do we get better roads or bigger parks these are important but how have we done and how accountable have we been.

Randie Johal

No more tax increases greater than inflation, control spending. Full and accurate project costs must be determined before a shovel goes in the ground.

Jesse Jimenez

Reducing taxes is like restricting the flow of blood to your brain. Tax is what the government needs to function as a leader for its citizens. The problem arises in its collection and disbursement or appropriation which is managed by human beings. In a large system, weeding out the few individuals who are causing the corruption is very laborious and intricate. These individuals are the cancer cells of our progress and prosperity.

Ben Isitt

I support progressive taxation of property and income, while limiting the rate of increase of residential property taxes. For this reason, I opposed the 4% property tax increase that a majority of Council members imposed on residential rate-payers in 2018, compared to a 1% increase on commercial rate-payers. I support fiscal measures to discourage speculation in real estate and encourage the use of residential property to provide housing, including vacancy taxes and other anti-speculation taxes.

Rose Henry

at this time I do not know enough about taxes to make any recommendations.

James Harasymow

Nobody likes taxes. Spending less is what I do over here in the real world. I’m going to suggest not spending on things we don’t need. That being said, two thing are inevitable, and death is one of them. I don’t make bad promises.

Riga Godron

The City does not need to add to housing insecurity by increasing property taxes beyond what is currently assessed. This would allow those on fixed incomes to age in place and have some assurance that their taxes were not going to cause their homes to be foreclosed upon. Businesses that own property should be paying their fair share. Development that occurs in the City should be taxed for any zoning variance.

Marg Gardiner

We need a “zero-based budget lens” overlaid on all programs in Victoria. Years ago a City study looked at the residential/business divide of taxes. By pitting businesses against residents the City distracts from the real issue, taxes are too high. My kids live in condos in Vancouver. Assessed value of their residences, combined, are more than the value of my home. Yet, their combined property tax is about 1/3 of my Property Tax. City tax increases should be within CPI.

Steve Filipovic

In 2001 our City’s Operating Budget was $105 Million/yr, now its approaching $250 Million. During this time the issues the citizens of Victoria have been facing have grown exponentially. Also In 2001 The Federal Government invited Mayors & City Managers to a conference where they were told how to increase revenues from their residents through increased Taxes, Fines & Fees. Clearly we can see the Mayors & City Managers took these lessons to heart. This trend has to stop.

Sharmarke Dubow

I want to push the province to reduce local government dependency on property taxes as the single tool local governments have to raise revenue. Local governments play an increasingly important role in building strong communities, and they need revenue tools to match their expanding responsibilities. I would support a land value capture tax to ensure that large windfalls in land value increases are fairly taxed.

Laurel Collins

This council initially stated they would raise property taxes by 2.6%, as city policy limits tax increases to inflation plus 1%, but went back on this commitment when they raised residential property taxes by 4%. I would not have broken that commitment to residents. Also, I support introducing more tools to reduce speculation. The Empty Homes Tax, which the province only allows the City of Vancouver to collect, should be extended to Victoria as a tool to crack down further on speculation.

Darlene Archibald

Taxes should be set at a reasonable amount and the increase should be closely tied to inflation. Sound money management through responsible spending will allow for minimal tax increases while using funds for needed infrastructure upgrades, projects and services.

Stephen Andrew

I support zero based budgeting and do not believe inflation plus 2% is an acceptable goal. Do you get a 2% increase every year? What about seniors ? We need to be responsible with your money, no more poor management such as the Johnson Street Bridge - $70 million plus over budget, the Bike Lane Project $7 million plus over budget, an estimated $2million spent on the former Police Chief investigation. We have a $500 million infrastructure deficit and we need to fix our aging city.

Marianne Alto

The City raises money primarily through service fees and property taxes, which then provide residential amenities, infrastructure development and maintenance and other City services. Property taxes should be capped annually at an average rate of inflation + 1%.

Gary Alberts

Property taxes have increased more than the rate of inflation, under the current Mayor and Council. Taxpayers, both young and old, cannot be asked year after year to help a City that does little to curb its spending. An audit of the Johnson St bridge will help a New Council be more proactive with developing a proper plan for the Crystal Pool upgrades.

Other Issues

Lisa Helps

A key issue we need to work through as a community is restoring civility to public dialogue. In order to meet some of the big challenges facing Victoria and all other 21st century cities, we need to be able to talk about solutions with clear minds and open hearts. To solve the challenges facing us, we need to come together and create a stronger social fabric where our first impulse will be love, connection and understanding, even when – and especially when – this feels hard.

Stephen Hammond

Laws applying to everyone. This last winter, when we couldn't keep up with shoveling the sidewalk in front of our house (it was coming down fast) we were issued a warning by the city. Fair enough. However, there seems to be a desire to let some people avoid responsibility and the laws when they choose to break them. When that happens, people ask themselves why they are obeying the laws when others don't have to. When given the opportunity, people will respect our laws and abide by them. I don't think that's asking too much.

Michael Geoghegan

Lack of consultation has been a major issue and has led to major mistakes eg the bike lane fiasco and statue controversy. I will establish a Mayor’s advisory council which will include representation from various groups including the small business and construction sectors. The implementation of a municipal dashboard on the City of Victoria website will make it easier for citizens to keep track of important issues and how their Mayor and Council voted on these issues.

Bruce McGuigan

Rob Duncan

Separated bike lanes are certainly an important investment in the future, but when they cost $2.7M per km, we need to be sure we're getting it right the first time around. There are a number of important safety problems and design flaws with the separated bike lanes that have been installed so far, and I think we need a moratorium on further separated bike lane construction while these problems are given further consideration, before we go ahead with more.

Saul Andersen

There are many, such as food security (how about boulevard and/or schoolyard farming?); drought (how about rainwater collection?); harm reduction (saves lives, makes communities safer, and reduces policing costs & risks).

David Arthur Johnston

We've been pretending to be rich and it has cascaded into madness. If our indenture is going to be turned around it will have to start somewhere.

RyMo

Art to procure Civic Identity : We need to think beyond your friends Etsy page. Every dash and curve of black forms letters, into words, into meaning. We need art - to reflect on the past...to change the future. We need art as a tool to discover who Victoria is, and who it isn't. Are we just a small Vancouver? Are we happy? Are we able to succeed as individuals? Are we connected to community?

Chris Zmuda

First fix old problems: Use a referendum of residents to choose whether to scrap the illegal pot shops, and decide whether to keep the bike lanes; fix homelessness in the city by engaging federal and provincial funding for homeless shelters; challenge the cost of the Johnson Street bridge project. Secondly, attack immediate problems: solve congestion in the city with more parking space, and the traffic snarl into the city with an express commuter bus system; just renovate Crystal Pool. Third, fix City Hall: Freeze those big salaries and change the CRD directors; improve tenant rights by challenging landlords with a Bylaw; make Victoria safe again with police presence on the streets; really promote Centennial Square as an attractive center for diverse culture in our City.

Geoff Young

(Besides the fundamental issues of housing, planning and homelessness) we hope to obtain federal grants to allow us to replace our current swimming pool. We don't want to sacrifice more park space to provide parking for the pool, and need to figure out how to use existing parking to serve the pool as well. I have advocated moving the pool and/or its entrance to allow this to be practical.

Charlayne Thornton-Joe

Land use issues are important in every neighbourhood. There is a need to built more housing but maintain the unique character of each of the neighbourhoods. Some neighbourhood plans need to be updated and we need to work with each neighbourhood to find that right balance of growth and maintaining attributes that are valued.

William Tate

Fully supporting the Film Commission which brings in millions to the City.

Douglas Stewart

CRUISE SHIPS It would benefit many a downtown merchant if cruise ships were required to spend more time in Victoria. No more dine and dash. Make the ships spend an entire day in port

Ted Smith

Jordan Reichert

Development is another issue that is regularly raised by people I speak with in the community. People are concerned about the changing identity of their neighbourhoods and loss of heritage. I believe that affordable housing which respects the character of our neighbourhoods is possible, but that we need to genuinely consult with our communities and restore trust in them that council is independent and acts to validate their concerns through policy.

Andrew Reeve

Another complaint I regularly hear has to do with the lack of engagement and transparency at City Hall. People are frustrated, feeling that our local government talks the talk on consultation but rarely follows through. They believe they aren't being heard. People also see a real lack of transparency when it comes to decision-making. I am in favour of shifting our Citizen Engagement department to focus on real consultation rather than PR spin and creating an online tracker of all council votes.

Sarah Potts

Our City Council can do more to ensure all Victorians are heard and that their needs are addressed. I want to improve neighbourhood consultations so it’s easy for residents and community organizations to share their perspectives and ensure that those perspectives are incorporated into city planning. To do this I would ensure transparency and accountability to residents with door to door outreach, online tools for consultation, and childcare at meetings.

DelMar Martay

Soultions

Pam Madoff

Jeremy Loveday

We are overdue for a comprehensive third-party review to evaluate city decision-making processes and ensure public input is heard and respected. I propose that the City undertake a governance review to help foster good governance, gain from citizen expertise, and centre public input in City decision-making processes. This review could cover everything from committee structures to land-use decisions with an eye towards making sure residents are heard and processes are efficient and effective.

Grace Lore

The infant-toddler childcare and before-and-after school care in this city is at a crisis point. The lack of representation of young families on city council has resulted in inadequate attention to this issue. See position & idea below.

Sean Leitenberg

Our neighbourhoods are feeling like they are being lost to developers. I want to make sure the appropriate developments are being produced through gentle density and with proper neighbourhood consultation.

Anna King

Protection and creation of increased greenspace for animals and humans alike are important, especially in the downtown core where parks are extremely limited. Increased parklets and shared spaces to gather (urban picnic areas and outdoor event space) as community amenities are desired. Further, considerations for those with limited mobility and those with disabilities are important in the downtown core as car access is increasingly limited.

Edison Kahakauwila

The city has several projects to consider, ships point inner harbor, Ogden Point and proposed separated bike lanes for example. These in fact effect several communities with in Victoria. If elected I would consider how best each of these projects effect people in a positive non-intrusive way. How will bike lanes effect traffic in the Cook Street corridor, how will James Bay manage growth and how will we enhance our Inner Harbor image?

Randie Johal

Crystal Pool cost and location. Greater community consultation has to happen before a major commitment is made. Central Park needs to be fully preserved and potentially increased by looking to build elsewhere.

Jesse Jimenez

The marijuana dispensaries are sprouting in Victoria like wild mushrooms. I have no qualms with patients using them for prescribed medicinal purposes. Is there a statistical prediction that more of citizens will become ill to need marijuana medication? After a deep and thorough study, New Zealand concluded that marijuana has no medicinal benefit and banned it forever.

Ben Isitt

Access to greenspace is integral to the quality of life, including neighbourhood parks in close proximity to a person’s home and access to wilderness areas in the region. Protecting and restoring natural areas and shoreline areas safeguards biological diversity and increases resiliency in the context of climate change. As a CRD Director, I have advocated consistently for protection of natural areas through the Regional Parks Acquisition Fund and for the expansion of the Regional Trails network.

Rose Henry

Besides affordable housing, transportation and hydro there is the issues of establishing a truth full relationship with people in authority positions and being heard in a good way by all its time. We struggle with being given enough time to have our voices and thoughts from being heard.

James Harasymow

Political lawn signs. They don’t help a single person except the person who’s name is on the sign. They are as healthy for the environment as plastic bags, except plastic bags are functional. Let’s please get rid of these political relics and even the political battlefield at the same time.

Riga Godron

I choose a council that reflects the demographic of Victoria. Statistics Canada 2016 indicated that the median income of Victorian's is $30 000. I would like to see a council that reflects all socio-economic groups that comprise Victoria. Individuals that live in Victoria need to see themselves reflected in Council. If you walk into the Victoria City Hall Chamber and look to your left you will see a wall of older Caucasian men and two Caucasian women. While the current council may have gender parity, there is more diversity needed.

Marg Gardiner

Normalization of Drug use/culture: The current approach to drug use (and abuse) is not working. Current policies are normalizing drug use rather than addressing problems. I urge all TC readers to explore the Portugal solution. Portugal went from heavy drug use to one of the the lowest drug problem areas in Europe. Their approach is based on societal expectations, obligations, and a determination to not accept drug-based communities. Treatment must lead.

Steve Filipovic

Climate is an issue on every bodies minds and it seems a topic rich in misinformation. This is why I'm concerned about City Hall getting sucked into PR Campaigns. The levels of co2 is near its record low being only 233 ppm above it. The levels during the last Ice Age were the lowest in Earth’s History, cold brings co2 levels down, its recovering now. Co2 is plant food and there is no evidence Climate is changing beyond its established path. Sea level rise is a great indicator & it says its a steady trend 0.6 mm/yr since Victoria was founded.

Sharmarke Dubow

Creating inclusive, welcoming and safe communities for everyone is important to me. I support adopting policies and programs that support seniors, youth, Indigenous and racialized people, immigrants and refugees, people with disabilities, LGBTQ and other people from historically disadvantaged communities. I also want to work with business and education institutions to retain international students so that Victoria’s economy has the best possible talent.

Laurel Collins

I love living here, and I want to ensure we are building a thriving, resilient city. To me that means supporting our entrepreneurs and local businesses, and removing barriers to businesses creating vibrant spaces, like food trucks, patios, and play spaces. It means encouraging placemaking, protecting and expanding green space, and making our community more walkable. It also means protecting our watersheds, protecting our coast and having a concrete plan to meet our climate leadership targets.

Darlene Archibald

When you live in a city you are either contributing to or destroying it. That may seem a bit extreme but we need to look at our actions and their impacts to see if we are contributing to the health of the area in terms of livability and a heathy economy. Do you know who your neighbours are? Do you shop online or do you visit your local stores? By supporting quaint little stores and welcoming tourists and people from outside the city to come, we help keep businesses and our city thriving.

Stephen Andrew

Accountability is lacking. Council must listen to citizens. No more 11th hour decisions constructed behind closed doors. We need transparent government. And we need our local politicians to acknowledge when they make mistakes and not hide behind misleading statements.As your councillor I will listen and show you respect even when we disagree. I will also acknowledge when I am wrong.

Marianne Alto

Strong business supports strong community, city and social services. We can enable and support business to grow in a measured way that fits the city and region. We can keep our average cap on tax increases to inflation + 1%, streamline consistent planning and business processes, put a modern value on industrial land and its use, explore tax relief for businesses affected by city construction, collect and share construction and investment data, and work together with small and large businesses to sustain the engine of service-providing revenue.

Gary Alberts

I am committed to a more open and comprehensive consultation process. Residents and business owners tell me that they are not being heard by the current Mayor and Council. Decisions affecting taxpayers will be held in open Council meetings after receiving input from all stakeholders.

About

This website was haphazardly created by unaffiliated Victoria resident, Danielle Leduc McQueen.

All information was compiled and collected in my spare time from candidate websites, newspaper articles, and LinkedIn profiles. I’ve tried to reference sources where relevant and keep a neutral stance, but this website was necessarily informed by my perspectives - I’m a millennial renter and new mom. I’m also a believer in the importance of democracy, and think government should be informed, policy-driven, and inclusive.

I created this site to hopefully encourage more people (especially young people) to get interested in municipal politics, get informed, and get voting.

I hope to continue to edit and update candidate summaries as the election approaches and more information becomes available.

TIPS?
SUGGESTIONS?
EDITS?

Please get in touch!

Thank you! Your submission has been received!
Oops! Something went wrong while submitting the form.